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20121130
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Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)
judicial counsel. of course, the judges locking horns with mr. morsi right after one of his decrees essentially disabled them. so they're talking. we're going to see what the outcome of that meeting is. in the meantime, the leading factions, leading opposition factions continue to protest behind us in tahrir square. these factions that represent women's rights groups, youth groups, minorities, their position so far has been we're not going to talk to mr. morsi until he reverses his decrees. we spoke to one of mr. morsi's top advisers earlier today. we asked him if that was a possibility. >> what kind of concessions are you willing to make? >> this decision is up to the president for us. >> is it possible to rescind his decrees? >> we have had a dialogue. >> reporter: are you prepared to consider rescinding, adjusting some of these decrees? >> decree is up to the president and we are accepting it. we may have some reservations. but as a whole, we must take a step to forward, not to backward. >> reporter: as you heard, we pressed them on the why reasonable degree idea of the president
. what should the united states of america do? saying this unacceptable. we thank mr. morsi for his efforts in brokering a cease-fire, which is fragile but this is not what the united states of america taxpayers expect and our dollars will be directly related to the progress towards democracy which you promised the people of egypt when your party and you were elected president. >> chris: let's talk about that because morsi took his steps ours after secretary of state hillary clinton praised him for helping to broker the peace deal between hamas and israel and the administration issued the state department a tepid criticism. how tough should they get? should they say you have to pull back? what should our demands and leverage be? >> our leverage is not only substantial bayance and aid, plus an imf deal but the marshaling world public opinion is also against this kind of move by mr. morsi. we appreciate president morsi's action but in the past it's always been the united states that's brokered these deals and there's a clear perception amongst hamas that they won on this one. unfortun
that mr. morsi honor that -- >> what leverage do we have with him? >> essential, there is a package of aid that the egyptians are asking for, forgiveness of debt is one aspect of that. and you know, i think that the message needs to be sent that the largess of the american taxpayers doesn't come for free. egypt has an obligation to stand by its commitments to israel, to oppose terrorist activity as we see coming out of gaza and now, into israel, aimed at innocent lives. and, greta, i think the larger picture in the middle-east is really reflecting iran activity. we are all very focused on iran's quest for nuclear weapons capability. but this incident also shows you iran's influence through its proxies. iran has played an active role in arming hamas, since 2008, and once israel went in there, that worked out a lot of things and there was not a lot of rocket attacks now we see the return because iran and its ally syria, have played a re-armament role in terms of tens of thens of rockets delivered into gaza that we now see the result of. so we have a real challenge in the middle-east for sure
condemnations. >> we have also had to -- the new head of government in egypt, mr. morsi -- recognize the importance of the truce with israel that egypt has had. some of the things he has done this week are very troubling toward that end. you upon, he went into gaza. while he was there, hamas launched more rockets, as a direct affront to that negotiated peace between egypt and israel that. piece is essential to u.s. security policy in the region. and so we are going to have to insist and mr. morsi honor that -- >> greta: what leverage do we have with him? >> well, i mean, certainly, there is a package of aid that the egyptians are asking for right now, for giveness of debt, is one aspect of that. you know, i think that the message needs to be sent that the largess of the american taxpayers doesn't come for free. egypt has an obligation to stand by its commitments to israel, to oppose terrorist activity, as we see coming out of gaza. and now, into israel, aimed at innocent lives. and gret ai think the larger picture in the middle-east is really reflecking iran's -- reflecting iran's ac
and thank mr. morsi for his efforts in brokering a cease-fire, which is, by the way, incredibly fragile but is not what is acceptable, what the american taxpayers expect and our dollars will be directly related to the progress towards democracy, which you promised the people of egypt, when your party and you were elected president. >> chris: let's talk about that. because, morsi took his step hours after secretary of state clinton praised him for helping broker the deal between hamas and israel and so far, at least the administration issued, the state department, a tepid criticism. how tough should they get with them? directly say pull back, what should our demands an leverage be? >> our leverage is obviously, not only the substantial billions in aid we provide, plus, debt forgiveness and an i. -- an imf deal, but the marshalling world publish opinion is against this kind of move by mr. morsi. we appreciate president morsi's action but it always in the past the united states that brokered the deals and there is a clear perception at least amongst hamas that they won on this one. and, un
of demonstrators, already the start of violence, and all this comes just one day after mr. morsi was praised, praised effusively by u.s. officials for his role in mediating the israel/gaza fight. back to you in new york. gregg: it just goes to show you how quickly events can turn around in that region of the world. steve heir began, we'll check back with you a bit later on. thanks very much, in cairo. patti ann: and another hotbed in that region, the hamas terror group is now accusing israel of breaking ceasefire rules two days after a truce was reached along the israel/gaza border. israeli officials say they will investigate reports that a palestinian man was killed. israel has arrested several palestinians suspected of blowing up a bus in tel aviv. we'll bring you the latest on that when we have that. gregg: those are just a few of the many stories we are following this morning. a busy day in "america's newsroom." >>> plus, a boat trip turning deadly off the coast of florida. how 23 people ended up in a fight for their lives. patti ann: and tragedy on the highway. a chain reaction crash ca
or a law he imposes until a new constitution is finalized. mr. morsi extended the time to write the new constitution and he dismissed the country's attorney general. reza sayah is overlooking everything in tahrir square. most of us were thinking that mohammed morsi really very much the peacemaker, key to the cease-fire between israel and hamas. doesn't even settle with the truce and then morsi announces this decree essentially a huge power grab. what is the significance? >> reporter: well, suzanne, the significance is until a parliament is formed here in egypt, until a constitution is drafted, he is the most powerful man in egypt, and, technically, he can do whatever he wants without any apparent oversight. that's why he is being called egypt's new dictator. that's why you have thousands of protests taking place behind us in tahrir square. the protesters represent the opposing factions, the liberals, the secularists, women's rights groups, the youth groups. essentially, their position is that we're not going to talk to mr. morsi until he rescinds his decrees, and we spoke to one of his
importantly he told aids he considered mr. morsi a straight shooter. your reaction? >> if in fact the new york times report is correct it shows this is simple. it shows blindness on the part of the president that he doesn't understand what motivates morsi, doesn't understand that basic ideology, it shows he does not understand the muslim brotherhood's objectives. with that kind of blindness as i think he demonstrated in other foreign policy areas it is very difficult in fact impossible to formulate effective american policy. it is a bad, bad sign for the u.s. and the middle east in the weeks and months ahead. >> just live with moresy and the muslim brotherhood no matter what they do? >>> i would like to know in all of these they have with president morsi what was it that gave morsi the view that he would have a freehand to try this particular gamut that he announced on our thanksgiving of all days to essentially side line the political opposition. it generated a lot of opposition. he may not be able to succeed on all of it do you think he sees it as a reward for brokering the truce. >> he feel
, now i'm king. megyn: what role do you think it had, if any, the praise that we gave to mr. morsi in the wake of his role in brokering a truce between hamas and israel last week >> that was strategic idiotcy. hamas was on the ropes, israel was winning on points. morsi stepped in and basically rescued hamas and got the cease-fire. our president, secretary of state, ambassador rice in the u.n. all gushed praise upon morsi and elevated him to the state us of global statesman. it was a terrible mistake because he hadn't earned that, and the next day he thumbed his nose, to put it politely at our government and the west entirely and said, i'm now in charge, i'll do what i want, egypt is going to do what i say, and, by the way, the revolution is over. megyn: does it make it tougher for us to now condemn what he's doing? so far we've had jay carney say we support democracy, we believe the government in egypt should reflect the will of the people, we have concerns about what morsi has done. >> it would be nice if we supported democracy. but i don't think this administration does. let's be
the positioning and navigating she has to do in her meeting with mr. morsi. >> soledad, we can report to you that, according to the u.s. embassy here, secretary clinton has arrived here in cairo and she's going to be meeting with egyptian president mohamed morsi very soon. with the violence escalating, the spotlight, the pressure is on secretary clinton and washington. the u.s. seems to be broadening its role. the key role the u.s. is going to play here is with its sway over israel. obviously, israel and washington are best friends. washington has a lot of influence with israel. but the problem is, washington does not have a relationship with hamas. the u.s. sees hamas as a terrorist group, of course. i think that's where egypt could play a significant role here. look for secretary clinton to push egypt, its president, mohamed morsi, to get hamas to make some concessions to possibly hammer out a cease fire. yesterday egyptian officials were optimistic that a cease fire would come. today, it's not the case. all parties here seem to be continuing the push to hammer out some sort of truce while the
they are able to pull that off. in the longer term it's a real balancing act for mr. morsi. here on the streets he has a population strongly in support of the palestinians but he's got to keep the peace. to keep the peace he's going to get western investments and see this economy going. we are seeing evidence of that balancing act behind me off in the distance, a small crowd of protestors teargassed a few moments ago and we could expect larger numbers on the streets tomorrow, gregg. gregg: thanks very much. ainsley: what does the cease-fire mean? what does the end game mean in the middle east. jonathan sanzer the founder of defense for democracy and the author of hamas vs. fatah, the struggle for palestine. happy thanksgiving to you. >> thank you. happy tkpapbghappen happy thanksgiving. >> i think the israelis and hamas are both claiming victory. the israelis got what they were looking for long range rockets smuggled in see a sudan. they took out all the rockets. for hamas 4 they were able to fire rockets into the israeli heartland. i don't think they will be able to do it to the extent of this
thank mr. morsi for his efforts in brokering a cease fire which is incredibly fragile but this is not acceptable and the united states of america taxpayers expect and our dollars will be directly related to the progress toward demaddress which you promised the people of egypt when your party and you were elected president. >> brian: joining us is the navy commander from the office of secretary of defense under george bush. he is jd gordon. is it up to the president to get more involved to tell morsi to stop with the absolute monarch thing. >> i think the president should stand up to the muslim brotherhood and say we will not send aid dollars to egypt. morsi put himself [pwao-fr] the courts and law. it is one dick traitorship replaced by another. we need to get tough on egypt. >> steve: when the arab spring first started people were optmistic and it is not turning out the way we hoped it would. >> no, in 2010 the survey poll in egypt found that 17 percent of the egyptians were favorable to the united states and 24 percent favorable to al-qaida and 60 percent to the isla
? >> dialogue. >> reporter: they want dialogue. they want concessions. they want mr. morsi to rescind his decrees. what kind of concessions are you willing to make? . >> the decision is up to the president. not up to us. we are ready for dialogue with our -- >> reporter: are you prepared to consider rescinding, adjusting some of those decrees? >> decree is up to the president, accepting it -- we may have some reservations. but as a whole, we must take a step forward, not backward. >> reporter: so two big headlines coming out of egypt today, first off, president morsi not scaling back his decrees, sticking with them and the muslim brotherhood calling off their 1 million-man demonstration scheduled for tomorrow. >> we'll have a lot more on this story coming up later this hour. thanks very much, reza sayah, from cairo. >>> other news we're following, including news from afghanistan as the united states looks to wind down its troop strength in afghanistan, plans are being made for a u.s. military force to stay on there even after the 2014 handover to afghan authorities. our pentagon correspon
department. >> were you for warrant that mr. mursi was going to do this? -- were you forewarned mr. morsi was going to do this? >> these are separate issues. we have raised our concerns and that, i think in party answers your question. secretary clinton is focused on working with the president down others, prime minister netanyahu, to help bring about a ceasefire and other allies can be saved and the possibility of moving forward on negotiations for more enduring peace could be realized. that was very important. the president played a very important role in that. separately, we have raised concerns about some of the decisions and declarations made on november 22nd and we continue to engage on this with the egyptians. the important thing is that the egyptian people want a government that reflects their will and we accept that. >> it was murky before thanksgiving. can you clarify the $4 trillion in debt as a reduction of over 10 years? >> it is reflected in his budget proposals that i know you all have read covered cover and is still the most substantive proposal by an elected official that
with mubarak. we are going to oust him. >> now today mr. morsi and the muslim brotherhood are scheduled to meet with the judges, the supreme judicial council, that's one of the groups that his decrees undermine. the problem is, there is no dialogue to get to the leaders of some of the other oppositions. >> and more than $4 billion as well and the judges are threatening to strike. so even with all of that, no decision for morsi to revoke that decree? >> well, we just spoke to one of his senior advisers, and he seemed to suggest that he might consider it, but many will say that if he backs up, it would be a politically wrong move for him. that it will be a sign of weakness. for now, there are no indications from his office that he wants to reverse the decree. >> and reza, just as we were going on air israel's defense minister ehud barak resigned. how could this affect today's talks between israel and hamas? >> it's not clear how ehud barak's resignation is going to impact these talks. but i doubt these talks are going to fall apart the decision for a cease-fire last week were made by the top offi
. >> the president said a month ago he didn't know whether egypt is our ally or not. >> we'll see. mr. morsi was involved in the ceasefire. but i think it is up to him now to demonstrate that he is going to stand with us, going to hohn 0or that peace treaty with israel that is so important to u.s. interests in the region, and actually facilitate what all of us would like to see there which is freedom for more egyptians. >> politically morsi seems clearly to be siding with hamas in that conflict. was he just playing for a certain element in egypt? because behind the scenes he was working with us to broker a peace. >> he is of the muslim brotherhood party. it is a party steeped in some of the very, very anti-western, anti-american ways. hamas has the same roots so it is a political situation that's very challenging but we look to him to be a leader and come down on the side of freedom and to recognize israel's right to exist as a jewish state in the region. that's what we're going to look for especially when he is coming to the white house which will come to congress to look for taxpayer aid f
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)

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